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No: One Simple Word for Your Best Research Results

No: One Simple Word for Your Best Research Results

Julia Eisenberg

Oct 11, 2017

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We’re all familiar with the common expression “kill two birds with one stone,” and in our society where more is always better, it sounds great in theory. We live in a ‘yes’ culture, fueled by the expectations set from our increasingly fast-paced environment where the go-getter who never says ‘no’ is expected to get ahead. However, are you really ever gaining the most out of your experiences  without delving deeper for clarity and stepping back to see the full picture?

With this in mind, Quirk’s recently conducted their annual survey of corporate researchers, which included a question about what defines poor-quality results in research projects. Using a combination of text analytics and human intelligence to analyze the 495 responses, our team identified three major themes, all caused by one key problem. Julia Eisenberg, Vice President of Insights, notes that saying yes too much tends to deliver bloated studies that fall short in these common categories: poorly defined objectives, obvious errors, and meaningless results.

In Quirk’s recent article, “No: One Simple Word for Your Best Research Results,” Julia goes on to emphasize that better research results stem from the power of saying ‘no.’ You can learn more about the pitfalls of poor-quality insights, how to avoid them, and how to plan your research project using clearly articulated objectives by reading the full article here.

Julia Eisenberg

Vice President, Insights

I love a great story – numbers are nice, but nothing is more compelling than hearing directly from your consumers.

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iModerate allowed us to not only connect with this hard-to-reach audience but to get a deeper understanding of their feelings on the subject of public service. iModerate promised at the outset to expand and clarify the quantitative findings in a way traditional online survey research has previously been unable to, and they delivered on this claim. As a result, we were able to expose the emotions shaping the perceptions of the class of 9/11.

Marc Porter Magee, Partnership for Public Service