//

Are these new logos super or sucky?

Are these new logos super or sucky?

Becky Sarniak

Aug 06, 2014

Share It

A brand may choose to change their logo for many reasons. In 2011, Starbucks changed their logo so that their name and “coffee” was no longer contained within their logo, a reflection of Starbucks’ efforts to move beyond coffee. Olive Garden recently changed their logo as part of a “brand renaissance.” With the controversy surrounding the name of the Washington Redskins, is a logo change imminent?

A logo can instantly identify a brand and evoke a whole range of consumer thoughts, memories and emotions. When my nephew was 3 years old (before he could read), he could point out the names of restaurants we passed based on the logos… even restaurants he had never visited before, indicating the power of a recognizable logo. So how does a logo change impact consumer loyalty, perception and consumer preferences?  Those are great questions, but we’ll save them for another blog post. Today, we are just interested in figuring out which of the following new logos work, who did it best, and who should have just left well enough alone. Cast your votes now!

Becky Sarniak

Manager, Moderating Services

What I love about research is learning about people and what they think. Discovering the reasoning behind behavior and what motivates people to move from a plan of action to action itself.

The insights I received from iModerate really brought our NPS program to life. While it was always highly-visible and important to key stakeholders it did not resonate as well with the majority of employees. The iModerate piece rounded out the NPS program and brought it to a place where it is now more valued, transparent and salient across the organization. Having the consumer’s voice and that context has helped us build business cases and impact operations in a way that has led to great success.

Adriana Smith, Manager, Brand Strategy, NRG Energy